ESA and PIP assessments; when assessors jump to subjective conclusions dismissing medical evidence

In many reports done by assessors or health professionals, as they are officially called, for PIP and ESA claims, there are often filled with assumptions and speculations that have no medical or rational basis. Sadly, these assumptions are often used as a reason to deny a claimant the support they actually deserve and often desperately need.

A common one is the belief that if one person does not take a lot of strong painkillers is because they are not really in pain. But there are many reasons why someone doesn’t or cannot take lots of strong painkillers and the reasons are often explained in details in the claim form or in the evidence provided by health professionals. Often the assessor seems to choose to believe it is because the pain is bearable or non existent.

Another one is that if a person  gives eye contact, is allegedly well kempt or ‘behaves normally’ (whatever that means) cannot possibly suffer from any mental health issue. Anyone who knows anything about mental health would know things are not as simple as that. No one can make a diagnosis in 30 minutes, often contradicting the medical evidence provided with the claim pack, written by real mental health specialists.

We have asked  on Twitter for some real examples to give an idea of how bad these assessments really are and how are failing people. Here some of the answers. You can tweet yours to @wowhour or add a comment below the article. Keep them coming. 

 

 

 

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