“Does the family of the frail individual know, how vulnerable her mother and grandmother is?”

Today has been a long day. I had an interview in Launceston, another place in Cornwall that lost it’s rail connections decades ago. The interview was about working in the care sector, a sector I know very well both from receiving care and trying to hold onto it. I visited Mum on the way back to my weekly voluntary role.

One of the people who is living in the same care home as Mum is staying in, is frail and has serious cognitive issues. The vulnerable individual can barely construct words verbally. The elderly person stuck in my mind all afternoon and is the main reason why l have to write this. I’m afraid Mum will lose Mum to her own mind and I’m afraid one day I will go to another world permanently.

Does the family of the frail individual know, how vulnerable her mother and grandmother is?  Does  she  have any surviving relatives? I could only managed an hour at work as emotionally I needed a break. Does Cornwall view me or anyone else with a significant disability as frail and someone who needs to be thrown into a care home immediately? This is the reason why care should never be used as a political tool, or be seen as a way to earn a quick fortune. it should be discussed in a way that talks about the reality of needing care.

Cornwall has had countless debates about care and I have been involved in one or two of them. I accidentally hit a kerb as I started my journey back into Cornwall this evening. Tyres can be replaced and Town Halls can be rebuilt again, but people cannot be treated in the same way.

I’m sorry Britain I cannot be the perfect husband to a create a career so l could provide a loving wife a holiday home in Cornwall, but  I do love fellow human beings very, very much and when I feel someone needs to be heard, then I will speak for them, which is rather ironic for a postverbal adult. Yes, we can all turn our heads away when it suits us, but that is not going to help me or other vulnerable adults in Cornwall to regain or maintain some sort of dignity.

Christopher

Share this Voice
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Leave a Reply